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Jane Rosen, Cash-Morandi

PRESS RELEASE

Jane Rosen Cash-Morandi

October 15 - December 19, 2015

OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, October 15, 6 - 8 PM

 

BETWEEN LANDSCAPE AND DOMESTIC TIME

New York, NY— Jane Rosen’s new exhibition of stone, glass, and bronze works, Cash-Morandi, is a play of presences—a balance between nature and culture, or what Rosen calls “landscape time and domestic time.” In her works, birds of prey and vessels formed of opaque glass on hewn stone piers, their surfaces and edges as worn as beach glass.

 

The title of the exhibition, Cash-Morandi, refers to two influences of quite different types; the first, Cash, was a gentle white horse who lived out his years on Rosen’s pastoral property on the California coast. The horse’s stature, peaceful nature, and perpetually dirt-speckled coat greatly influenced Rosen’s artistic forms and surfaces. The second, Morandi, is the Italian artist Giorgio Morandi, whose restrained still lifes art critic Holland Cotter once called “emotionally audacious…because of what they don’t say.”

 

Like Cash, the works in Cash-Morandi have a muscular presence, complications of surface, and an overriding sense of calm; like Morandi’s two-dimensional works, Rosen’s works are rigorously composed, but in three dimensions—not simple studies of objects, but wholly new incarnations of everyday objects—vestiges of the everyday world that carry their histories and emotional freight into an encounter with the viewer.

 

Rosen’s references are not limited to the two inspirations she directly cites—she also draws upon the iconography of the falcon-god Horus from ancient Egyptian art and the constructed environments of Louise Nevelson, to name but two. Yet, in the gallery space these works evoke not specific allusions, but the texture and shape of past places, objects, and experiences, worn smooth in their transit to the present—a bridging of “landscape” and “domestic” time.

 

As Michael Klein writes in the catalogue essay that accompanies the exhibition, “There is a balance of forms and also a balance of materials: stone versus glass; glass versus stone; old and new combined. Something found and some made. If Morandi created an illusionistic pictorial world in which these objects can be looked at and felt then Rosen is drawing us into a real world…her objects inhabit…where they gracefully exist alongside us.”

 

“Jane Rosen: Cash-Morandi” is on view October 15 – December 19 at Sears-Peyton Gallery’s Chelsea location at 210 Eleventh Avenue. An evening reception will take place October 15 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Sears-Peyton Gallery is open 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturdays. A catalogue of the exhibition with an essay by Michael Klein is available. For more information or to request further press images, contact the gallery at info@searspeyton.com.

Jane Rosen, Cash-Morandi

Oct 15 – Dec 19, 2015