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New England Home Magazine highlights artist Deborah Dancy

February 23, 2017 - Robert Kiener

In works with a visceral, spontaneous feel, Deborah Dancy explores the amorphous zone between abstraction and representation.

With Miles Davis’s moody, improvisational Stairway to the Gallows blasting away in the background, Deborah Dancy layers thick gobs of blue oil paint onto a just-begun abstract painting in her spacious, light-filled Storrs studio. She uses a brush to add a sinuous green line, then coats on yellow paint with a plastic spatula. Pausing, she stands back and inspects her work before hurriedly scraping off much of the paint she’s just added.

Oblivious to a friend who has quietly walked into her studio, she’s lost in the moment, caught up in what she has called the “conversation” or “orchestration” she has with every painting and drawing she creates. Dancy, a much-lauded painter who lists a Guggenheim Fellowship among her many awards and grants, stands back and considers her painting.

FotoRoom interview with photographer Tyler Haughey

January 25, 2017 - FotoRoom

Worldwide, the words Jersey Shore have become synonymous with bulky guys and busty girls partying hard and shaming themselves in so many different ways (thank you, MTV). For the non-American, Jersey Shore is actually the common name used for the coast of the US State of New Jersey, a popular summer destination since the 1950s, when many new resorts were constructed to host the influx of tourists. American photographer Tyler Haughey’s beautiful series Ebb Tide captures the unique architecture and mood of these resorts during the off season, when the tourists are gone and the motels sprinkled with snow.

A Season of Psychic Noise: Bo Joseph Interviews with Artsy

November 16, 2016 - Suzy Spence

On the first day of his exhibition A Season of Psychic Noise, I had the pleasure of speaking with fellow painter Bo Joseph. Bo and I were born the same year and attended New England colleges where our initiation to art history in the late 80s was through Louise Gardner’s encyclopedic tome Art Through the Ages. We were in agreement that the book had been useful (we still own our copies), and that it was regrettable to have professors skip entire chapters on Africa or Asia in the service of presenting a linear Western leaning history. I was fascinated to learn that he’d remedied this with extensive travel and research, a journey that has enabled him to define art on his own terms.

Slate: Tyler Haughey Photographs Motels in his Series, "Ebb Tide"

August 19, 2016 - Jordan G. Teicher

Five years ago, Tyler Haughey, then a student at Drexel University, was driving along the coast when he happened to pass through the Wildwoods. A Jersey Shore native, he’d heard about the Wildwoods but had never been to any of them before. It was February, and the motels were deserted, but he found them captivating, and so he stopped to photograph some of them.

“It felt like I’d happened upon an abandoned film set,” he said.

Artsy Interviews Shelley Reed: Never-Ending Painting

June 7, 2016 - Amy Rahn

Artist Shelley Reed excerpts small details from Old Master paintings, expanding and re-contextualizing them in her often large-scale black and white paintings. On a recent sunny morning in Brooklyn, Amy Rahn spoke with the artist about the origins and intentions behind her work, the time-traveling potential of representation, and her current exhibition at Sears-Peyton Gallery.

Poogy Bjerklie, The Hudson Review by Karen Wilkin

May 19, 2016 - Karen Wilkin

Poogy Bjerklie’s debut exhibition at Sears-Peyton Gallery, Chelsea, titled “Inland,” reminded us of what happens when observation is internalized and used freely.  Bjerklie’s mysterious, intimate landscapes appear to be about places she knows well-probably in her native Maine-filtered through memory. 

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Bittersweet at Sears-Peyton Gallery

May 4, 2016 - Art Out

"Bittersweet" featured in Musee Magazine.

Time and Place: Kathryn Lynch's interview with Artsy

March 1, 2016 - Amy Rahn

Over her more than 25 years painting and exhibiting her work in New York and elsewhere, Kathryn Lynch has established herself as a painter whose works harness the lush materiality of paint to gesture towards subjects seemingly beyond the frame—relationships, change, the passing of time. On the occasion of Kathryn Lynch’s two-part exhibition, A View of One’s Own at Sears-Peyton Gallery, I sat down with the painter to talk about her life, paintings, and the curiously dictatorial tendencies of her shapes.

Contemporary Watercolor Artists You Should Follow

February 18, 2016 - Angie Kordic

Widewalls Magazine names Top 10 Contemporary Watercolor Artists to Follow including Lourdes Sanchez

Deborah Dancy: Between Abstraction and Representation - ARTPULSE

December 16, 2015 - Jeff Edwards

Although her art is thoroughly abstract, Deborah Dancy’s paintings, drawings, and works in other mediums are intimately bound to the world of concrete objects and the ephemeral perceptions and feelings of everyday life. On her website (deborahdancy.com), she comments on her fascination with “the poetic terrain of the incomplete, the fragment, the ruin and residue of ‘almost was,’ and ‘might become’” that she’s encountered in the zone between abstraction and representation. In the following interview, Dancy talks about how this notion has influenced her artmaking; the wide and ever-expanding array of thoughts, impressions, and situations that have shaped her artistic practice over time; the interaction of different mediums in her creative process; and ways in which the commonplace and the near-at-hand have often had a profound influence on her most abstract work.

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