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Jane Rosen featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

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Rick Shaefer featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

Click here for more information


Shelley Reed featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

Click here for more information


Rick Shaefer wins Art of the Northeast Best in Show

July 5, 2017

Silvermine Arts Center announced today its award winners and finalists in the 67th annual Art of the Northeast Exhibition, Silvermine's signature show, which is open to artists from Maine to D.C.  David Kiehl, Nancy and Fred Poses Curator at the Whitney Museum, served as the 2017 curator.

Kiehl's Best in Show was Fairfield resident Rick Shaefer's large-scale drawing, "Sugar Maple," done on charcoal on vellum on aluminum.


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Deborah Dancy in Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

June 13, 2017 - Kemper Musem of Contemporary Art

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today introduces the work of more than twenty exceptional artists in conversation with one another for the first time. With works in a range of media, including painting, sculpture, printmaking, and drawing, the exhibition showcases a diverse range of unique visual vocabularies within non-representational expression. By highlighting these artists’ individual approaches to form, color, composition, material exploration and conceptual impetus within hard-edge and gestural abstraction, Magnetic Fields provides an expanded history of non-pictorial image and object-making. The exhibition not only celebrates these artists as leaders in the field, but also the enduring ability of abstraction to convey both personal iconography and universal themes.


University of Maine Museum Acquires Painting by Isabel Bigelow

March 25, 2017

The University of Maine Museum of Art has acquired a painting by artist Isabel Bigelow. Isabel Bigelow’s 2016 oil painting on paper titled Waiting was acquired by the Museum for its permanent collection, which encompasses some four thousand artworks created after 1945.

Download press release below.


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University of Maine Museum Acquires Ink Painting by Lourdes Sanchez

March 25, 2017

The University of Maine Museum of Art has acquired a painting by artist Lourdes Sanchez. Lourdes Sanchez’s 2016 ink painting on silk, Untitled, 2016 was acquired by the Museum for its permanent collection.

Download press release below.


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The Art Institute of Chicago Acquires Drawings by Shelley Reed

March 25, 2017

The Art Institute of Chicago has acquired a series of seven drawings by Boston-based artist Shelley Reed. The artist’s 1993 series, “Men (after Van Dyck),” joined the Museum’s collection of prints and drawings as a gift after its exhibition as part of the Van Dyck, Rembrandt, and the Portrait Print exhibition of 2016.

Download the press release below.


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Tyler Haughey in Photolucida Critical Mass Top 50

November 15, 2016 - Photolucida

Photolucida pick Top 50 Critical Mass photographers of 2016, including Tyler Haughey.


Popular Photography: Tyler Haughey, Ghosts in Winter

November 15, 2016 - Vanessa Mallory Kotz

MALIBU, SAHARA, Monaco—it sounds like an exotic world tour, but you can go to all three in New Jersey! These mid-century modern motels named for sunny locales pepper a five-mile stretch of the Jersey shore, just north of Cape May, known as the Wildwoods. Tyler Haughey first visited the area one January, after the throngs of people had packed up their beach towels and dusted the sand off their feet, leaving these architectural gems to sit lonely and shuttered.


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