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Kathryn Lynch awarded 2018 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellowship

July 11, 2018 - Two Coats of Paint

This year hardworking panelists Julia Whitney Barnes (Dutchess), Franklin Evans (New York), Elliot Green (Columbia), Sarah McCoubrey (Onondaga), and Mie Yim (Kings) selected the The New York Foundation for the Arts painting fellowship recipients from a staggeringly large pool of 3,071 applicants. Each artist will receive a cash grant of $7,000, and the three finalists — Jordan Casteel, Clayton Schiff, and Don Voisine — will each receive prestige and a few other benefits, but no funding. In the 32 years that NYFA has been awarding the fellowships, $31 million has been distributed, which sounds like a lot until you consider the economic benefits artists have brought to so many New York communities over the years. The state should consider expanding the program. Here are images and links for the 2018 NYFA grant recipients, some thoughts about the selection, and a bit of advice for painters who didn’t receive funding this year.


Tyler Haughey "Everything Is Regional"

June 16, 2018

Tyler Haughey released his first book of photography, Everything Is Regional, compiling photographs that he has taken since 2010. The book acts as a monograph, examining the threads that run through his work and various projects. Everything Is Regional examines the built environment of northeastern coastal towns and explores how we use, interact with, and remember places designed and known for summer recreation. 


University of Maine Museum of Art Acquires Jen Wink Hays Painting

March 13, 2018

The newly acquired work by Wink Hays will be featured in the museum’s 2019 exhibition, Summer of Painting: Selections from the Museum Collection. This show will be on view at the University of Maine Museum of Art from May 19 – August 31, 2019.


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Jane Rosen added to permanent collection at the National Museum of Wildlife Art

March 2, 2018 - Buckrail

Jackson Hole, WY – The National Museum of Wildlife Art announced the acquisition of five new works of contemporary art chosen at the Blacktail Gala on Saturday, February 24.

The new works include Wendy Klemperer’s metal sculpture “Barney,” Jane Rosen’s painting using coffee, Korean watercolor, and ink “Mantle,” Sarah Hillock’s “Anthony and Camilla, Part II,” Peter Haslam-Fox’s watercolor “Hooded Hawk,” and an untitled ceramic plate, created by Pablo Picasso.

Link to full story

 


University of Maine Acquires Suzy Spence Painting on Paper

January 11, 2018

The University of Maine Museum of Art has acquired a painting by artist Suzy Spence. Suzy Spence’s 2017 flashe painting on paper, Death (Rider), was acquired by the Museum for its permanent collection.


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Jane Rosen featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

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Rick Shaefer featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

Click here for more information


Shelley Reed featured in Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

Touchstones, Totems, Talismans: Animals in Contemporary Art

October 13, 2017 - February 11, 2018

Ask the beasts and they will teach you the beauty of this earth. — Francis of Assisi

The inspiration for this exhibit dates back to the 2004 BMAC exhibit Andy Warhol: The Jon Gould Collection. The most commented-on works in that show were the large prints from Warhol’s 1983 “Endangered Species” portfolio. Observing visitors’ reactions to those powerful images, I sensed that their aesthetic experiences were enriched by the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild.

Depicting animals—as symbols, teachers, muses, companions—connects human cultures across time. Pictures of animals serve as proxies for happiness, distress, or fear. They speak of love, remembrance, and condolence. Whether literal or abstract, animal images call into play both our experiences with the creatures themselves and the often deep-seated characteristics, traits, and qualities we assign to them.

Featuring the work of Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer, and Andy Warhol, this exhibit offers a mere glimpse into the complexity of human-animal relationships in contemporary art. The selected works are diverse in intention and execution. Some are humorous; others are unsettling. All invite contemplation of the various ways in which animals inhabit our personal experiences, our cultural history, and our common world.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

Click here for more information


Rick Shaefer wins Art of the Northeast Best in Show

July 5, 2017

Silvermine Arts Center announced today its award winners and finalists in the 67th annual Art of the Northeast Exhibition, Silvermine's signature show, which is open to artists from Maine to D.C.  David Kiehl, Nancy and Fred Poses Curator at the Whitney Museum, served as the 2017 curator.

Kiehl's Best in Show was Fairfield resident Rick Shaefer's large-scale drawing, "Sugar Maple," done on charcoal on vellum on aluminum.


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Deborah Dancy in Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

June 13, 2017 - Kemper Musem of Contemporary Art

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today introduces the work of more than twenty exceptional artists in conversation with one another for the first time. With works in a range of media, including painting, sculpture, printmaking, and drawing, the exhibition showcases a diverse range of unique visual vocabularies within non-representational expression. By highlighting these artists’ individual approaches to form, color, composition, material exploration and conceptual impetus within hard-edge and gestural abstraction, Magnetic Fields provides an expanded history of non-pictorial image and object-making. The exhibition not only celebrates these artists as leaders in the field, but also the enduring ability of abstraction to convey both personal iconography and universal themes.